"The Fertile Crescent is a crescent-shaped region containing the comparatively moist and fertile land of otherwise arid and semi-arid Western Asia, and the Nile Valley and Nile Delta of northeast Africa. The term was first used by University of Chicago archaeologist James Henry Breasted. Having originated in the study of ancient history, the concept soon developed and retains today meanings in international geopolitics and diplomatic relations.
In current usage the Fertile Crescent has a minimum extent and a maximum extent. All definitions include Mesopotamia, the land in and around theTigris and Euphrates rivers. The major nation in this region is Iraq (formerly Mesopotamia), with small portions of Iran near the Persian Gulf, Kuwait to the south and Turkey in the north. More typically the Fertile Crescent includes also the Levantine coast of the Mediterranean Sea, with Syria, Jordan,Israel, Lebanon and the West Bank. Water sources include the Jordan River.
At maximum extent, the Fertile Crescent also may include Egypt and the Nile Valley and Delta within it. The inner boundary is delimited by the dry climate of the Syrian Desert to the south. Around the outer boundary are the arid and semi-arid lands of the Zagros Mountains to the east, theAnatolian highlands to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the west." From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fertile_Crescent

Web links on Pinterest


[Ancient] Hittites

The Hittites were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire at Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around the 18th century BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Asia Minor as well as parts of the northern Levant and Upper Mesopotamia. After c. 1180 BC, the empire came to an end during the Bronze Age collapse.

Sumer on Pinterest

Links to web resources: maps, history overiviews, archaeology, art, religion, architecture,

Babylonia Empire on Pinterest

Resources for investigating Hammurabi, Babylonian empire, empire builder, created a system of roads, improved communication and trade, created a system of rules “Hammurabi’s Code”. Main idea, justice system, laid down set of rules, organised in different categories: trade, labour, property, family, practicing medicine, controlling dangerous animals. Objects, relief sculpture of king standing in front of sun god, Shamesh who was also the god of justice. Hammurabi stone pillar

Assyria on Pinterest

Resources for investigating King Sargon II, Assyria, place city of Assur, capital city was Nineveh – objects relief sculptures of king and his officials, relief sculptures of soldiers and warriors – ideas defence of territory and empire building – inventions - invented weapons, e.g. battering ram. Nineveh a city of learning with a library of thousands of clay, tables. Assyrians were record keepers – this is how we know about life in ancient Mesopotamia.

The Phoenicians on Pinterest

Resources for investigating the Phoenicians, Tyre and Sidon (Eastern Mediterranean), trade, writing (easy alphabet to record trading with different peoples around the Mediterranean basin and beyond)- Object – stone inscription of. alphabet, coins, etc.

The Israelites on Pinterest

Resources for investigating the Israelites, a people, Abraham (such a person may have lived sometime between 2000 and 1500 B.C. according to pieced together stories and archaeological evidence and events), Moses (according to the Torah) King Saul, King David, King Solomon, (Moses), place – Jerusalem in the land of Canaan. Idea – monotheism –famine, migration, exile objects – Torah, Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Persians on Pinterest

Resources for investigating the ancient Persians,Cyrus, Cambyses, Darius, their capitol cities. Ideas: empire building, controlling empire by dividing it into provinces with satraps (governors) in charge of each province, unified coinage system for empire(under Darius), Royal road and communication through efficient courier system, tolerance of local religions, and customs and legal systems (as long as not in conflict with empire); Zoroastrianism.

Phoenicia

"Phoenicia (UK
play
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) from the Greek: Φοινίκη: Phoiníkē) was an ancient Semitic civilization situated on the western, coastal part of the Fertile Crescent and centered on the coastline of modern Lebanon. All major Phoenician cities were on the coastline of the Mediterranean, some colonies reaching the Western Mediterranean. It was an enterprising maritime trading culture that spread across the Mediterranean from 1550 BC to 300 BC. The Phoenicians used thegalley, a man-powered sailing vessel, and are credited with the invention of the bireme.[3] They were famed in Classical Greece and Rome as 'traders in purple', referring to their monopoly on the precious purple dye of the Murex snail, used, among other things, for royal clothing, and for their spread of the alphabet (or abjad), from which all major modern phonetic alphabets are derived." From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenicia


Amarnamap.png


The Phoenicians on Pinterest

Resources for investigating the Phoenicians, Tyre and Sidon (Eastern Mediterranean), trade, writing (easy alphabet to record trading with different peoples around the Mediterranean basin and beyond)- Object – stone inscription of. alphabet, coins, etc.


National Geographic

video introduction

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/world-regions/#/06/West-Asia

Mesopotamia


The British Museum Mesopotamia page

http://www.mesopotamia.co.uk/menu.html

The University of Chicago Oriental Institute

http://mesopotamia.lib.uchicago.edu/#

Mesopotamia: Crash Course World History #3


Uploaded by crashcourse on Feb 9, 2012
In which John presents Mesopotamia, and the early civilizations that arose around the Fertile Crescent. Topics covered include the birth of territorial kingdoms, empires, Neo-Assyrian torture tactics, sacred marriages, ancient labor practices, the world's first law code, and the great failed romance of John's undergrad years.

Resources:
The British Museum's Mesopotamia site:
http://dft.ba/-mesopotamia
The Epic of Gilgamesh: http://dft.ba/-gilgatext or get a hard copy at http://dft.ba/-gilgamesh2
Mesopotamia: Assyrians, Sumerians, Babylonians by Enrico Ascalone:http://dft.ba/-meso
The Mesopotamians by TMBG: http://dft.ba/-tmbmesopotamians


Ancient Mesopotamia for Kids


Civilisations- Mesopotamia [1/6]


Uploaded by easeen on Dec 10, 2007

Mesopotamia, or 'the country between two rivers', is the oldest civilisation to have flourished at the confluence of two rivers: the Tigris and the Euphrates. The Mesopotamians included various peoples, the Sumerians, the Babylonians, the Akkadians, who coexisted and succeeded one another, mixing and inter-relating in a Near East with a wide range of racial facets. These different peoples, who once lived along the banks of the two rivers, have left behind an archaeological heritage of inestimable value.How did they flourish in such a hostile environment? Where did their wealth come from? And how did this perfectly structured civilisation finally fade and disappear for ever?
This popular series gives new insights into some of the most influential civilisations to shape the world as we know it. To understand where we are now, it might help to understand where we have been.


Civilisations- Mesopotamia [2/6]



Civilisations- Mesopotamia [3/6]



Civilisations- Mesopotamia [4/6]



Civilisations- Mesopotamia [5/6]



Civilisations- Mesopotamia [6/6]




Lion Hunting in Ancient Mesopotamia


Published on Sep 10, 2013 by the Royal Ontario Museum
This wall is about 2,700 years old! It tells the story of a brave Assyrian King who comes face to face with a lion. Told in frames like a comic book, this is just one of the stories you'll find inside the exhibition.

The Western Tradition #3: MESOPOTAMIA

The Western Tradition 03 : Mesopotamia from DuyTue Quote02 on Vimeo.


Published on Apr 8, 2012
Eugen Weber Presents THE WESTERN TRADITION
Part 3: MESOPOTAMIA

Hanging Gardens of Babylon (Ancient Iraq)


Secrets of the Ancients Hanging Gardens of... par NeomiTianna-9433


Babylon (/ˈbæbələn, -ˌlɒn/; Akkadian: Bābili(m);[1] Sumerian logogram: KÁ.DINGIR.RAKI;[1] Hebrew: בָּבֶל, Bavel;[1] Ancient Greek: Βαβυλών Babylṓn; Old Persian: 𐎲𐎠𐎲𐎡𐎽𐎢 Bābiru; Kassite language: Karanduniash; Arabic: بابل‎, Bābil) was a significant city in ancient Mesopotamia, in the fertile plain between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The city was built upon the Euphrates, and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods.
Babylon was originally a small Semitic Akkadian city dating from the period of the Akkadian Empire c. 2300 BC. The town attained independence as part of a small city state with the rise of the First Amorite Babylonian Dynasty in 1894 BC. Claiming to be the successor of the more ancient Sumero-Akkadian city of Eridu, Babylon eclipsed Nippur as the "holy city" of Mesopotamia around the time Amorite king Hammurabi created the first short lived Babylonian Empire in the 18th century BC. Babylon grew and South Mesopotamia came to be known as Babylonia.
The empire quickly dissolved after Hammurabi's death and Babylon spent long periods under Assyrian, Kassite and Elamite domination. After being destroyed and then rebuilt by the Assyrians, Babylon became the capital of the Neo-Babylonian Empire from 609 to 539 BC. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. After the fall of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, the city came under the rules of the Achaemenid, Seleucid, Parthian, Roman and Sassanid empires. More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babylon

Babylonia Empire on Pinterest

Resources for investigating Hammurabi, Babylonian empire, empire builder, created a system of roads, improved communication and trade, created a system of rules “Hammurabi’s Code”. Main idea, justice system, laid down set of rules, organised in different categories: trade, labour, property, family, practicing medicine, controlling dangerous animals. Objects, relief sculpture of king standing in front of sun god, Shamesh who was also the god of justice. Hammurabi stone pillar


Profile of Hammurabi

with Jade Broadus
Hammurabi was the King of Ancient Babylon and is know for the Code of Hammurabi. Learn more about Hammurabi's influence in history and on future governments in this About.com video.
Watch the Profile of Hamarabi at
http://video.about.com/ancienthistory/Profile-of-Hammurabi.htm

Hammurabi Game

Play the Hammurabi Game of Strategy and Resource Allocation



In Search Of The Trojan War (5of6): Empire Of The Hittites (BBC)




Decisive documental evidence from the Hittites. Recurrent conflicts with the Mycenaeans.



[Ancient] Hittites

The Hittites were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire at Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around the 18th century BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Asia Minor as well as parts of the northern Levant and Upper Mesopotamia. After c. 1180 BC, the empire came to an end during the Bronze Age collapse.