Module 2: Evaluating Web Resources

In this module, you'll investigate techniques for judging a web page's usefulness, bias, and authenticity

Vocabulary for this Module:

bias
authority
relevance
reliability
currency

internet-dog.gif

The above cartoon by Peter Steiner has been reproduced from page 61 of July 5, 1993 issue of The New Yorker, (Vol.69 (LXIX) no. 20) only for academic discussion, evaluation, research and complies with the copyright law of the United States as defined and stipulated under Title 17 U. S. Code.
http://www.unc.edu/depts/jomc/academics/dri/idog.html

How to Evaluate Websites (part 1): Reliability & Relevance



How to Evaluate Websites (part 2): Currency & Purpose



How to Evaluate Websites (part 3): Accuracy, Evidence & Presentation




The 5 Whys of Website Evaluation Kathy Schrock
http://kathyschrock.net/abceval/5ws.pdf

http://prezi.com/rvhpo02nkavc/5ws-of-web-site-evaluation/


5 Factors for Evaluating Websites

by Chris Betcher on Jan 30, 2009

digital-literacy-presentation2.jpg

Presentation slide by Phil Macoun


Websites to Evaluate

Improbable Research: Feline Reactions to Bearded Men http://www.improbable.com/airchives/classical/cat/cat.html
Tree Octopus http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/
Dihydrogen Monoxide http://www.dhmo.org/
RYT Hospital http://www.rythospital.com/2011/
The J. Paul Getty Museum http://www.getty.edu/museum/
Haggis Hunt http://haggishunt.scotsman.com/
Archaeology.org - Zombie Attack at Hierakonpolis http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/hierakonpolis/zombies.html


Assignments & Exercises


The following tasks need to be completed this week.
  • Investigate
View the material presented for this module: Watch the videos, look at Kathy Schrock's Prezi presentation and pdf file, and Chris Betcher's presentation.
  • Practice
Investigate each of the seven websites listed above under Websites to Evaluate. Make notes about them using these points of information, and decide what you think about their authenticity and reliability.
  • Authority - Can you find out who is the author/creator?
  • Currency - What date is on the information? When was the page last updated?
  • Content/Purpose - Can you tell what the page is for?
  • Audience - Can you tell who the page is for? Who is the intended audience?
  • Structure/Workability - Is it a well-constructed page? Do the links connect correctly?
What makes you think this site is real, i.e., a reliable source of information? What makes you think it is biased, a joke, or unreliable?
  • Share
Go to your Personal Journal page, and do the tasks outlined there: complete a form for each web page list above, and write a brief reflection describing what you think about these pages.